The Tech Coalition Safe Online Research Fund

End Violence and the Technology Coalition have launched the Tech Coalition Safe Online Research Fund to tackle online child sexual exploitation and abuse (CSEA). From now until 11 April 2021, we are seeking proposals for research that will expand knowledge of online CSEA and explore the most effective measures for preventing it. Winning proposals will be awarded grants from $20,000 to $250,000. 

We are interested in innovative research that can impact relevant policy and product development, with a priority given to research that can help inform the technology industry's approach to combating online CSEA. This collaboration is part of the Technology Coalition’s Project Protect. Project Protect seeks to prevent and eradicate online CSEA through technology innovation, collective action, research, knowledge sharing, and increased accountability. This fund is an essential part of that process, supporting actionable research that will lead to real, lasting change for children’s digital safety. 

End Violence will support the Tech Coalition Safe Online Research Fund while building on four years of work in the Safe Online space. Since our inception in 2016, End Violence has invested USD$44 million in 52 projects focused on preventing and eliminating online CSEA, reaching nearly 70 countries across the world.

Learn more.

APPLY

The Tech Coalition Safe Online Research Fund will advance the world’s understanding of online child sexual exploitation and abuse (CSEA). $800,000 will be used to fund this research, with $20,000 to $250,000 allocated to each grant. Eligible research for this call will deliver actionable insights that contribute to practitioner understanding of online CSEA, with a priority on technology industry practice across four specific areas. We seek to fund academic and/or applied research which may draw from a range of quantitative, qualitative or mixed methods. Research should increase our understanding and provide the application of:  

  1. Efficacy and impact of online CSEA deterrence and prevention interventions, including an understanding of offender pathways and children’s digital experiences. This includes increasing the evidence base for effective, actionable industry reporting to and investigation by the appropriate authorities; impactful education and outreach strategies; and strengthening the capacity of all stakeholders in preventing, disrupting and responding to online CSEA. 
  2. Evolving technology may present new or exacerbate existing threats by contributing to changes in offender or children’s behaviour or creating new challenges and risks. Research could provide solutions to respond to implications of evolving technology, for example, abuse detection in encrypted environments or real-time reporting in live streams. This area of focus also includes potential solutions and opportunities offered by technology developments for risk mitigation and better tools and strategies around behavioural interventions. 
  3. Well-being, collaboration and support for survivors, improving well-being and resilience for staff such as content moderators and others, as well as enhancing collaboration among all sectors working to end online CSEA. 
  4. Policy and legal considerations are critical to shaping online CSEA deterrence and response. In this channel, research could include assessment of policy implementation over time and upstream interventions such as public health or safety-by-design approaches; addressing age-appropriate design and experiences; and understanding how privacy and ensuring children’s rights intersect in the fight against CSEA 

If your work is aligned with our general criteria above, we want to hear from you!

Winning proposals will be awarded grants from US$20K to US$250K. End Violence encourages applications that fall anywhere within this range, though there is more limited opportunity for larger funding amounts. Most significantly, proposals will be evaluated for alignment of the scope and activities outlined with the proposed budget. Payment will be made to the applicant’s institution, and in the case of a consortium, to the main grantee organisation. Grantees’ instalments are determined based on their proposed budgets, with 1-2 instalments depending on project duration and budget. Indirect costs are limited to 7% for grants.  

Review the full Request for Proposals (RfP), read over the FAQs, and apply below. You can review the full application, which is available for download, to develop your proposal before beginning the application form. Please note that for applications to be reviewed, you must apply via the below online form. We will not be accepting applications over email or mail. 

APPLY

End Violence and the Technology Coalition invite not-for-profit organisations (i.e. research institutes and academic institutions, civil society organisations (CSOs), non-governmental organisations (NGOs), international organisations) to respond to this Request for Proposals (RfP).

Consortia are also encouraged to apply; however, the organisation submitting the application will be considered the main grantee and must be a not-for-profit organisation (i.e. research institutes and academic institutions, CSOs, NGOs, and international organisations), bearing all the contractual responsibilities vis-à-vis End Violence.  

CRITERIA

Only entities that fulfil these mandatory requirements will be considered eligible: 

  • legally registered organization that is not-for-profit  
  • the research addresses one or more of the four areas of the 2021 Open Call   
  • all funding will be directed to an institution, not to individuals 
  • the research project lead may submit one proposal 
  • at minimum, the applicant organisation should have demonstrated relevant prior expertise and/or research experience 
  • the organisation has a safeguarding policy in place or is willing to develop a policy * 

*Researchers are also responsible for obtaining ethical approval for their proposed project, such as approval from a university’s ethics/ institutional review board (IRB) or when not available, include a detailed description of their ethics policy (e.g. embedding a UNICEF Procedure for Ethical Standards in Research in the research design) which will be evaluated carefully as a part of the criteria for selection.  

Read more about who we will and will not fund here.

ADDITIONAL MATERIALS

Please note that if you are selected for a Grant award, your organisation will be asked to submit two years of the latest financial audit reports. If your organisation does not have this readily available, a description of why audits are not available and further financial documentation will be requested for the required due diligence by End Violence. As End Violence is hosted administratively by UNICEF, organisations without a risk rating within UNICEF's financial management system may be required to undergo a financial micro-assessment during the grant period. 

APPLY

Prior to completing your proposal, please review the below FAQs carefully. Questions or clarifications during the application period can be submitted through this form. Before submitting a question, please review the below FAQs to confirm your question has not already been answered.

Answers to all questions submitted will be periodically reviewed and shared publicly.

FAQ Form Responses

Updated 4 April

1. Is it possible to edit the application form once it is submitted?

Jotform does not allow edits to the application once submitted. You may submit a full new application if needed with the updates by the deadline, 11 of April 11:59PM EST. Please indicate in the new application in the response for 'Name of organisation' that this is an updated application with the same project title/primary contact details so that we may identify and disregard the version submitted at an earlier timestamp.

2. Is it possible to submit updated annexes once the application has been submitted? If there was an error uploading a document in the application form, is there another way to submit?

If you need to submit an updated annex document or had trouble uploading a document in the online application form, you may submit documents clearly indicating the primary contact and proposal title of the relevant application to fund@end-violence.org by the deadline of 11 April 11:59 EST. Please note that any documents, links, or attachments submitted that are not part of the required supporting documentation may not be reviewed as part of the application.

3. Where can I find the budget and financial reporting template? How do I upload the budget annex to the system?

The budget and financial reporting template is available for download on this Tech Coalition Safe Online Research Fund webpage in the sidebar of documents, named Project Budget Annex. There is a question in the online Application form that allows you to upload the completed budget annex.

4. Please advise what IDC base calculation should be used for the 7%. Total Direct Costs (TDC), Total Costs (TC) or Modified Total Direct Costs (MTDC).

Proposals are entitled to include up to 7% of Total Direct Costs (TDC) for IDC.

5. Are funds from a state or federal source?

The contract for successful applicants will be with UNICEF and funds will be disbursed from UNICEF on behalf of End Violence. The funds are initially from the Technology Coalition, a registered US non-profit, as donor for this work.

6. Can one organization be the main grantee or a partner on multiple proposals? What is the limit of proposals where an organisation can be the main grantee or partner? Could you please clarify if the lead researcher (not the project lead) can be a lead researcher on another application?

Multiple proposals from the same institution are acceptable; there is no limit on the amount of proposals per organisation. However, consideration will be given to ensure diversity of grant recipients and therefore applications from the same institution will be carefully evaluated with this in mind. A maximum of two grants may be awarded per institution.

Joint applications with other organisations that form part of a consortium are encouraged. The application should identify a primary not-for-profit organisation applicant that meets the eligibility criteria as specified and is willing and able to sign a Grant Confirmation Letter with UNICEF.

Individual researchers may only be named project lead on one application; however, project leads may be a supporting researcher on another application. There is no limit to the amount of applications in which an individual researcher can be a supporting researcher.

7. Is a partnership with other organizations on this project compulsory or necessary selection criteria?

While consortiums are encouraged to apply, partnerships and collaborations are not required for the proposal. A single organisation can submit an application.

8. Are organisations that have not worked with End Violence Against Children before eligible to apply? Are current or former grantees of End Violence Against Children eligible to apply? Are UN agencies eligible to apply for this funding opportunity?

You do not need to be a member of the Partnership to End Violence Against Children nor a former End Violence Fund grantee to apply. Current and former End Violence grantees are also eligible to apply. Any legally-registered organisation that is not-for-profit is welcome to apply.

Collaboration with other stakeholders such as private companies, law enforcement, government, etc. is encouraged; however, the primary applicant must be a not-for-profit organisation. We encourage maximising synergies across jurisdictions/sectors/ communities, as well as awareness of and sharing with existing research.

9. Are the Request for Proposal documents available in languages other than English? Are proposals accepted in languages other than English?

All Request for Proposal and Application documents are only available in English. Applications are only accepted in English via the online portal.

10. Where is the budget template?

The budget template is available for download on this Tech Coalition Safe Online Research Fund webpage in the sidebar of documents.

11. Can a researcher from a university apply for this funding round?

Individuals cannot submit proposals. The entity submitting the proposal needs to be a legally registered not-for-profit organisation such as research institutes and academic institutions, civil society organisations (CSOs), non-governmental organisations (NGOs), and international organisations.

End Violence will assess the suitability of the team and key personnel to implement the project. The team members’ formation and experience in similar projects will be an asset for the proposal. At a minimum, the team should have demonstrated relevant prior research experience and/or methodological expertise. Qualifying criteria include at least two previous research outputs. To provide evidence of this criterion, you should include links or direct uploads of attachments.

12. What is the expected project start date and duration for this funding opportunity?

Awards will be announced in Q2 2021. Implementation should begin shortly after and grants can be for a timeframe of up to 2 years.

13. Is $250,000 the maximum cost of the whole research proposal or the contribution requested from End Violence? Is the Fund providing 100% financing and initial advance payment? What is the payment scheme?

The maximum amount requested from End Violence in an application is $250,000. Co-funding is encouraged and details of co-funding will be considered in proposals. End Violence can fund up to 100% of the project cost. Depending on the duration of the project, End Violence will disburse payment in 1 or 2 instalments. The first payment is made upon signing the contract.

14. Where can information be found on what is considered a direct or indirect cost specifically? For example, can rent be direct charges or would that be considered part of the 7% indirect costs?

For End Violence, there are two types of costs the grantees can incur: Direct and Indirect Costs. In line with the UNICEF budgeting policies and internationally recognised cost accounting definitions, Direct Costs will be those associated with activities contributing to project/programme results and to policy, advisory, technical and implementation activities needed to achieve results and classified in the categories project/programme and development effectiveness (ie costs which are associated with specific programmes/projects); and Indirect Costs will be those associated with management results and classified in the management category (ie costs which are not associated with specific programmes/projects).

In the case of rent, this would be detailed as a direct cost, clarifying the portion of the rent that is allocated to the research project.

To further clarify which acceptable, effective, and efficient program direct costs have been recognised by UNICEF financial rules and regulations, a non-exclusive list can be found in Annex 2. As far as the Indirect Costs are concerned, grantees are entitled to 7% of the total project Direct Costs as a "management" fee. In case the projects are carried out in partnership with other organisations, the sum of the Indirect Costs from the different organisations covered by the grant shall be a maximum of 7% of the total project Direct Costs.

15. Can an applicant organization give a service contract to organization/s (for-profit and non-profit) for specific pieces of research?

Yes, sub-contracts with for-profits and not-for-profit organisations are allowed and should be detailed with relevant agreements included as attachments as possible. However, if the core team does not have the necessary technical expertise for specific pieces of research, the organisation should explain in response to the relevant application questions in their Proposal what type of technical expertise their partners or advisors are able to provide. As per UNICEF rules, all sub-contracting of activities described in the grantee’s Programme Document requires the prior approval of the UNICEF Funds Support Office. Advance approval is not required if partners sub-contract out general services such as general office IT support, bookkeeping, cleaning services, etc.

Consortia are also encouraged to apply; however, the organisation submitting the application will be considered the main grantee and must be a legally-registered organisation that is not-for-profit, bearing all the contractual responsibilities vis-à-vis End Violence. Collaboration with other stakeholders such as private companies, law enforcement, government, etc. is encouraged; however, the primary applicant must be a legally-registered organisation that is not-for-profit. We encourage maximising synergies across jurisdictions/sectors/communities, as well as awareness of and sharing with existing research.

Pre-prepared FAQs

1. What is the End Violence Fund? 

The End Violence Partnership is a public-private partnership launched by the United Nations Secretary-General in 2016 to accelerate progress towards Sustainable Development Goal 16.2: ending all forms of violence against children by 2030. End Violence comprises 500+ partners, including governments, civil society organisations, United Nations agencies, the private sector and research institutions, and acts as a global platform for advocacy, evidence-based action, and investments to end all forms of violence against children. 

The End Violence Fund is a flexible funding vehicle that: a) identifies and addresses new and emerging challenges that threaten the achievement of SDG 16.2; b) invests in innovative initiatives that have the potential to replicate and scale, and c) generates evidence, data and learning to inform policy and increase the impact of programmes.

Through its Safe Online work, End Violence provides funding, policy and advocacy guidance, and coalition-building to significantly advance national, regional and global efforts to prevent and respond to online child sexual exploitation and abuse (online CSEA). In 2020, End Violence’s Safe Online investment portfolio reached US$45 million in grants to projects achieving tangible results in nearly 70 countries. The Safe Online's grant portfolio can be found here.

Both the End Violence Partnership and the End Violence Fund are financially and administratively hosted by UNICEF (United Nations Children’s Fund).

2. What is the Technology Coalition?

The Technology Coalition (TC) was formed in 2006 when industry leaders (including Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Adobe, Amazon and Yubo) came together to fight online CSEA. The TC believes that by working together, they can have a greater impact combating these horrific crimes than working alone.

The TC brings together companies across the technology industry. Together, TC members tackle risks to online child safety by sharing best practices, providing mentorship opportunities, and pushing coordinated efforts to improve the detection and reporting of sexual abuse imagery and other exploitative practices that put children at risk.

3. What is the Tech Coalition Safe Online Research Fund?

End Violence and the Technology Coalition are launching the Tech Coalition Safe Online Research Fund to expand knowledge of online CSEA and explore the most effective measures to prevent it. This collaboration is part of Technology Coalition’s Project Protect: a plan for renewed investment and ongoing commitment to combat online CSEA in different ways.

2021 Open Call: KEY FACTS

1. What is the primary focus of the 2021 Open Call?

We are interested in innovative research that produces actionable insights that can impact product and policy development, with a priority given to research that can help inform the technology industry's approach to combatting online CSEA.

The 2021 Open Call focuses on research to better understand and fight online CSEA, particularly academic or applied research using quantitative, qualitative or mixed methods within the four specific areas - focusing on increasing our understanding of and providing application of:

  • Efficacy and impact of online CSEA deterrence and prevention interventions and frameworks including understanding of offender pathways and children’s digital experiences. This includes increasing the evidence base for: effective, actionable industry reporting to an investigation by the appropriate authorities; impactful education and outreach strategies; and strengthening the capacity of all stakeholders in preventing, disrupting and responding to online CSEA.

  • Evolving technology may present new or exacerbate existing threats by contributing to changes in offender or children’s behaviour or creating new challenges and risks. Research could provide solutions to respond to implications of evolving technology, for example abuse detection in encrypted environments or real-time reporting in livestreams. This area of focus also includes potential solutions and opportunities offered by technology developments for risk mitigation and better tools and strategies around behavioural interventions.

  • Well-being, collaboration and support including meaningful resources for survivors, improving well-being and resilience for staff such as content moderators and others as well as enhancing collaboration among all sectors working to end online CSEA.

  • Policy and legal considerations are critical to shaping online CSEA deterrence and response. Research could include: assessment of policy implementation over time and upstream interventions such as public health or safety-by-design approaches; addressing age-appropriate design and experiences, and understanding how privacy and ensuring children’s rights intersect the fight against CSEA.

2. What types of research will End Violence support?

The Tech Coalition Safe Online Research Fund is interested in receiving Proposals from not-for-profit organisations that are developing innovative research that produces actionable insights that can impact product and policy development, with a priority given to research that can help inform the technology industry's approach to combatting online CSEA. If your organisation is aligned with the 2021 Open Call selection criteria, we would like to hear about your proposed research.

3. What are the funding modalities for this Open Call?

The 2021 Tech Coalition Safe Online Open Call funding of ~US$800,000 will be made available as grants from End Violence. The funding was contributed by the Technology Coalition as part of their Project Protect. Award amounts will range from US$20,000 to US$250,000. End Violence encourages applications that fall anywhere within this range. Proposals will be evaluated for alignment of the scope and activities outlined with the proposed budget. Payment will be made to the applicant’s institution, and in the case of a consortium, to the main grantee organisation. Grantees’ instalments are determined based on their proposed budgets, with 1-2 instalments depending on project duration and budget. Indirect costs are limited to 7% for grants, to be co-shared by all the grantees and sub-grantees within each proposal.

4. What is the geographical focus of the Open Call?

This Open Call is global. We encourage proposals from researchers, or collaboration with researchers, that are based in or with situational awareness of the country/countries being researched. End Violence and the Technology Coalition encourage applicants from diverse contexts, countries and cultures, as well as applications with representation from or inclusion of Global South countries.

5. Do all components of the research used or proposed to be developed need to be open access?

End Violence and the Technology Coalition encourage research projects that are open access, where appropriate to the research and governed by the necessary data and ethical frameworks. If this is not possible given the sensitivity of this research area, please elaborate why in the proposal.

Please note the following text in the Grant Confirmation Letter that all applicants are expected to countersign should they be selected as grantees for further clarity: "Except as otherwise expressly provided for in the Programme Document and Budget and/or Grant Confirmation Letter, all intellectual property and other proprietary rights including, but not limited to, patents, copyrights, and trademarks, with regard to products, processes, inventions, ideas, know-how, or documents and other materials which the Grantee develops using the Grant will be managed in a way that maximises public accessibility and allows the broadest possible use."

ELIGIBILITY

1. What types of organisations are eligible to submit a proposal?

Funding will be granted via an Open Call for proposals for not-for-profit organisations (i.e. research institutes and academic institutions, CSOs, NGOs, international organisations). Consortia are also encouraged to apply; however, the organisation submitting the application will be considered the main grantee and must be a not-for-profit organisation, bearing all the contractual responsibilities vis-à-vis End Violence. Collaboration with other stakeholders such as private companies, law enforcement, government, etc. is encouraged; however, the primary applicant must be a not-for-profit organisation. We encourage maximising synergies across jurisdictions/sectors/communities, as well as awareness of and sharing with existing research.

2. Can my organisation develop a joint application in partnership with another organisation?

Yes. Joint applications with other organisations that form part of a consortium are encouraged. The application should identify a primary not-for-profit organisation applicant that meets the eligibility criteria as specified and is willing and able to sign a Grant Confirmation Letter with UNICEF.

3. Can an organisation submit multiple proposals?

Yes, as long as the eligibility criteria are met for each proposal. Multiple proposals from the same institution are acceptable; however, consideration will be given to ensure diversity of grant recipients and therefore applications from the same institution will be carefully evaluated with this in mind. A maximum of two grants may be awarded per institution. Researchers may only be named project lead on one application; however, project leads may be a supporting researcher on another application.

4. Can I submit a proposal from anywhere in the world?

Yes, although the organisation must be legally registered in the corresponding country. End Violence and the Technology Coalition encourage applicants from diverse contexts, countries and cultures, as well as applications with representation from or inclusion of Global South countries.

5. Can current or past End Violence Fund grantees apply for this Open Call?

Yes. The Fund welcomes applications from current and past grantee organisations if their projects align with the objectives of the Open Call and they have the technical, financial, and human resource capacity to meet the requirements of this Open Call.

6. Can I submit a Full Proposal for funding for a school or university project if I’m a student?

No. Individuals cannot submit proposals. The entity submitting the proposal needs to be a legally registered not-for-profit organisation such as research institutes and academic institutions, civil society organisations (CSOs), non-governmental organisations (NGOs), and international organisations. Consortia are also encouraged to apply; however, the organisation submitting the application will be considered the main grantee, bearing all the contractual responsibilities vis-à-vis End Violence.

7. Do I have to have a degree or a university qualification to qualify?

No. End Violence will assess the suitability of the team and key personnel to implement the project. The team members’ formation and experience in similar projects will be an asset for the proposal. At a minimum, the team should have demonstrated relevant prior research experience and/or methodological expertise. Qualifying criteria include at least two previous research outputs. To provide evidence of this criterion, you should include links or direct uploads of attachments.

8. Can applicants outsource the technical expertise in my project?

Yes, but if the core team does not have the necessary technical expertise, the organisation should explain in response to the relevant application questions in their Proposal what type of technical expertise their partners or advisors are able to provide. As per UNICEF rules, all sub-contracting of activities described in the grantee’s Programme Document requires the prior approval of the UNICEF Funds Support Office. Advance approval is not required if partners sub-contract out general services such as general office IT support, bookkeeping, cleaning services, etc.

9. Is there a maximum number of people I can have on the team?

No. Suitability of the team to the proposal will be evaluated as well as if the budget is commensurate with the proposed scope of activities.

10. Can I submit my application in a language other than English?

No. If applicant organisations would like to write the proposals in a local language, End Violence would be pleased to receive the English translation of such proposals. We recommend that you use translating tools if you’re unable to complete the proposal in English. However, applicants should keep in mind the due date for all applications and ensure that the English translation is as accurate to the extent possible.

11. What is the duration of the supported initiatives?

The Fund will support initiatives that last for a maximum of 24 months. A detailed description of the methodology and milestones with the associated timeline is required as part of the application process.

12. What is the maximum budget my organisation can apply for?

The grants awarded will have a budget minimum of US$20,000 and maximum of US$ 250,000. Organisations are required to submit a comprehensive budget using the annex provided on the application page.

13. What are indirect costs and how does End Violence handle them?

As per UNICEF rules and regulations, indirect costs are those associated with management results and classified in the management category (i.e. costs which are not associated with specific programmes/projects). The Fund will accept indirect costs that are 7% or lower, and they must be co-shared by as many grantees and sub-grantees involved in the implementation of your project. This should be reflected in your budget as part of your application.

14. What is a due diligence assessment?

As Fund Custodian and Administrator, UNICEF is the entity that sends out money to grant recipients of the Tech Coalition Safe Online Research Fund. Prior to receiving a grant from End Violence via UNICEF, UNICEF will conduct a due diligence assessment by ensuring that all grantees selected are reviewed with respect to their (i) core values screening and (ii) fiscal management capacity assessment. The core values and integrity assessment are to ensure alignment with UNICEF’s core values, whilst the financial management capacity assessment determines eligibility for funding in terms of institutional, managerial, financial and technical expertise.

15. What is a child safeguarding policy?

We require each of our grantees either have or are in the process of developing a robust child safeguarding policy to guide their work. However, it’s not just about having a policy – it’s about ensuring there are procedures in place to put that policy into practice, and that all information on those procedures is easily accessible to practitioners, parents and children.

End Violence is committed to supporting organisations’ efforts to improve their safeguarding capacity and practice. End Violence allows grantees to include a budget line for safeguarding and protection within their proposal budget. This can include (but is not limited to) costs for capacity building, policy development, a proportion of costs for specialist personnel, as well as costs associated with managing safeguarding/protection concerns. The End Violence’s Safeguarding Policy is available for all the grantees to consult here.

APPLICATION PROCESS

1. How does the application process work?

Applicants are expected to submit a Full Proposal using this online application form starting from 4 February 2021. The last day for submissions of Proposals is 11 April 2021 11:59 PM EST. Submissions to this Open Call will be reviewed by technical experts at End Violence as well as an Advisory Group of external experts, as applicable. Please note that your organisation may be invited to provide more details before funding decisions are final.

2. What are the different steps in the application process?

STEP 1:  Check that your organisation/company and project meet the eligibility criteria, which includes:

  • Your organisation is a legally registered organization that is not-for-profit
  • The research addresses one or more of the four areas of the 2021 Open Call 
  • All funding will be directed to an institution, not to individuals
  • The research project lead may submit only one proposal, although project leads may be a supporting researcher on another application
  • At a minimum, the applicant organisation should have demonstrated relevant prior expertise and/or research experience
  • The organisation has a safeguarding policy in place (including data privacy) or indicates that they are willing to develop a policy

STEP 2: Any questions?

Please ensure you have thoroughly reviewed the Tech Coalition Safe Online Research Fund webpage before beginning your application.

In addition, please review the full Request for Proposals. You can access a downloadable version of the Application Form to use in developing your application, but the final submission must be made in the online portal.

Lastly, carefully review these Frequently Asked Questions. You can also submit questions that you may have through this form. We will endeavour to upload new questions and answers every two weeks.

STEP 3: Submit your Full Proposal Application

All submissions must be made in English. 

3. What are the scoring criteria?

Technical experts at End Violence, as well as an Advisory Group of external experts (as applicable), will review the proposals based on an objective assessment of the following criteria:

  • Relevance of research for tackling online CSEA
  • Novelty and feasibility of research
  • Applicability and inclusivity of research
  • Suitability of the team to implement the research project 
  • Alignment between budget ask and research project goals

Please see the full Request for Proposals (RfP) for more details.

4. Is it possible to contact someone at End Violence about this Open Call before applying?

Questions or clarifications during the application period can be submitted through the FAQ form. Answers to all questions submitted will be shared publicly periodically.

SUCCESSFUL APPLICATIONS

1. How are the funds disbursed to successful applicants?

UNICEF is the Fund Administrator and Custodian for End Violence and has the responsibility to disburse the funds to selected grantees. Therefore, organisations awarded funding from End Violence must be eligible and willing to receive funding from UNICEF as a grantee. Please refer to question 6 for more details. Once selected and cleared, UNICEF will issue a Grant Confirmation Letter for countersignature.

2. Are there any restrictions for what the funds invested are used for?

The invested funds should be used for what the grantee has specified in its proposal and accompanying budget. End Violence, at its discretion, may conduct an audit during or after the implementation of the project.

3. Can I see a sample of the Grant Confirmation Letter?

Yes. A sample grant confirmation letter with its legal stipulations and conditions is available here for interested applicants.

4. What are the monitoring and evaluation requirements for successful applicants?

End Violence will actively monitor the progress of all supported projects during the period of the grant, and periodic evaluation of progress. Specifically, all grantees will be required to:

  • Report on project progress during annual reporting periods using End Violence’s reporting templates, which will be provided to grantees
  • Establish and report on key milestones according to qualitative and quantitative indicators selected by the grantee based on their research project proposal using End Violence’s Monitoring & Evaluation template, which includes suggested indicators
  • Describe key potential barriers or obstacles you can foresee to the development of this research and any quantifiable risks, dependencies or framework conditions (such as regulation, standards, public acceptance, workforce considerations, financing of follow-up steps, cooperation of partners), that may determine whether and to what extent the expected outcomes will be achieved in the related question on the application at the start of the project
  • Identify the challenges encountered and steps taken to address them throughout the project
  • Attend ad hoc webinars, bilateral (online) meetings or other discussions relevant to the project, including field visits by End Violence team members, when feasible and as applicable.

5. What are the reporting requirements for this Open Call?

The reporting requirements for grantees are included in Section III of the Grant Confirmation Letter shared above.

KEY DEFINITIONS

1. What is online child sexual exploitation and abuse?  

Unless otherwise indicated, the definitions provided below are from the Luxembourg Terminology Guidelines for the protection of children from sexual abuse and exploitation (2016).  

Online child sexual exploitation and abuse (CSEA) refers both to the sexual abuse of children that is “facilitated by information, communication and technology (ICT) and to sexual abuse of children that is committed elsewhere and then repeated by sharing it online through, for instance, images and videos.

Child sexual abuse material (CSAM) is used to describe a subset of “child sexual exploitation material” where there is abuse or a concentration on the anal or genital region of the child. Both terms refer to material that depicts and/or that documents acts that are sexually abusive and/or exploitative to a child.  

Livestreaming of child sexual abuse of a child in real-time occurs when a child is forced by an offender(s) to appear in front of a webcam to engage in sexual behaviour or to be subjected to sexual abuse. These acts are then livestreamed over the Internet to a paying customer (also an offender(s)) who uses and/or requests a particular type of abuse to be perpetrated over the webcam in real-time. It is also very possible that the offender is also the one perpetrating the abuse against the child physically. 

Online sexual grooming refers to the process of establishing and building a relationship with a child through the use of the Internet or other digital technologies to facilitate either online or offline sexual contact with that child.  

Sexual extortion of children, also called “sextortion”, is the blackmailing of a child with the help of images of that child in order to extort sexual favours, money, or other benefits from her/him under the threat of sharing the material beyond the consent of the depicted child.  

2. How does End Violence define a child?  

End Violence refers to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) which defines a child as a person below the age of 18, unless the relevant laws recognise an earlier age of majority. On some issues, States are obliged to provide for minimum ages, such as the age for admission into employment and completion of compulsory education; but in other cases, the Convention is unequivocal in prohibiting life imprisonment without the possibility of release or capital punishment for those under 18 years of age. 

 Dates

Proposal applications must be submitted through the online form

All submissions must be made in English. Interested entities that meet the eligibility criteria are required to complete and submit the RfP Application form online and provide the information and supporting documents indicated in the form.

Before you do so, please ensure you have:

Proposals will be reviewed after the close of the call. The last day for submissions of applications is 11 April 2021 at 11:59 PM EST.

Only shortlisted applicants will be contacted and may be requested to provide additional clarification, as applicable. End Violence may come back to applicants with feedback and/or requests to reshape or rescope their proposal if needed.

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 The Technology Coalition and End Violence have set up an Advisory Group, which is made up of representatives from key online CSEA focused organisations, alliances and independent experts. The Advisory Group plays a central role in outlining the RfPs for selection criteria, dissemination strategies and knowledge-exchange activities to amplify the impact of the research.

Key roles of the Advisory Group include:

  • Designing and determining the scope of the RfPs
  • Establishing adequate, transparent scoring and assessment frameworks to evaluate funding proposals
  • Supporting with RfP outreach and promotion
  • Reviewing the most viable proposals and rating them through the agreed-upon framework
  • Deciding on finalists and grantees of the Tech Coalition Safe Online Research Fund

Members of the Tech Coalition Safe Online Research Fund Advisory Board include:

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UNICEF/UN0392559/Kolari

Image Credits

UNICEF/UN0392559/Kolari